Radiocarbon dating dates back to Feecam x

Intriguingly, a boar's tusk had been placed between his legs, and it has been suggested that the injury may have severed his penis or testicles, and that the tusk was there to replace what he had lost in preparation for the after-world.The new dates now show that these burials could be consistent with members of the Viking Great Army.The journal is published six times a year, and we also publish conference proceedings and monographs on topics related to our fields of interest."Everything which has come down to us from heathendom is wrapped in a thick fog; it belongs to a space of time we cannot measure.This confuses radiocarbon dates from archaeological bone material and we need to correct for it by estimating how much seafood each individual ate." A double grave from the site - one of the only Viking weapon graves found in the country - was also dated, yielding a date range of 873-886 A. The grave contained two men, the older of whom was buried with a Thor's hammer pendant, a Viking sword, and several other artefacts.

Desmond Clark (1979) wrote that were it not for radiocarbon dating, "we would still be foundering in a sea of imprecisions sometime bred of inspired guesswork but more often of imaginative speculation" (Clark, 1979:7).

Cat Jarman said: "The previous radiocarbon dates from this site were all affected by something called marine reservoir effects, which is what made them seem too old.

"When we eat fish or other marine foods, we incorporate carbon into our bones that is much older than in terrestrial foods.

New scientific research now shows that this was not the case and that the bones are all consistent with a date in the late 9th century. Excavations led by archaeologists Martin Biddle and Birthe Kjølbye-Biddle at St Wystan's Church in Repton in the 1970s and 1980s discovered several Viking graves and a charnel deposit of nearly 300 people underneath a shallow mound in the vicarage garden.

Historical records state that the Viking Great Army wintered in Repton, Derbyshire, in 873 A. The mound appears to have been a burial monument linked to the Great Army.

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